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How this Kansas City restaurant owner serves food and faith as he fasts for Ramadan_freckle removal home remedies

2022-07-06 05:31:36 Form:Technology freckle - professional freckle author: click:198
J.M. Banks·5 min read

Lutfi Khalifah pulls a fresh batch of chicken wings from the smoker as the scent of fried catfish and the sounds of blues music waft through the building.

He is tasting none of it.

Khalifah, who owns nine Lutfi’s Fried Fish locations in the Kansas City area, including this Lee’s Summit spot, makes his living around feeding his masses of fans.

But Khalifah is also a nearly lifelong follower of the Islamic faith and is partaking in the sacred fasting of Ramadan. For this one month, his mind goes off food and is all about faith.

“It’s me saying, I am going to give this time to my lord because he gave me so much over these 11 other months of the year,” says Khalifah, who has been a prominent name in the Kansas City restaurant scene since 1994.

He correlates his success in business with his focus toward his faith and knowing his true purpose. Khalifah believes there is no greater way to serve than by feeding people. Even during a period when he denies himself the luxury of a daytime meal.

“It isn’t a struggle at all anymore. It becomes a way of life. There are so many benefits mentally as well as spiritually,” Khalifah says as he prepares the food. He became a Muslim at the age of 5, when his parents converted to the faith. Fasting, he says, reminds people what is important.

Lutfi Khalifa, left, and his cousin Byron Hill play checkers as they wait for customers to arrive at his Lutfi’s Fried Fish restaurant in Lee’s Summit.
Lutfi Khalifa, left, and his cousin Byron Hill play checkers as they wait for customers to arrive at his Lutfi’s Fried Fish restaurant in Lee’s Summit.

This year, Ramadan runs from April 1 to May 1. Each year, it falls on different days on the Western calendar because it is tied to the ninth month of Islam’s lunar calendar.

During Ramadan, practicing Muslims do not eat, drink (not even water), smoke, or have sexual relations with a spouse from sunup to sundown.

The observance is “faith in terms of believing something so much that you feel compelled to do something about what you say you believe,” says Sulaiman Salaam, the imam of the Al Haqq Islamic Center in Kansas City.

Ramadan, he says, is not a burden or punishment, but an opportunity to take a break from physical wants and focus on spiritual needs.

“It’s all about taking the time to look at yourself and see who you are. Faith means you believe you have a purpose and trying to find what fulfills that purpose,” says Salaam.

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