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Like Bruce Willis, I Have Aphasia. Here's What Life Is Like With This Incurable Disorder._freckle removal grow back

2022-07-06 06:40:22 Form:Technology freckle - professional freckle author: click:996
Bobbi Dempsey·7 min read
Bruce Willis revealed in late March that he's retiring from acting due to aphasia. (Photo: VCG via Getty Images)
Bruce Willis revealed in late March that he's retiring from acting due to aphasia. (Photo: VCG via Getty Images)

Bruce Willis revealed in late March that he's retiring from acting due to aphasia. (Photo: VCG via Getty Images)

When news broke on March 30 that Bruce Willis is retiring from acting (at least for the time being) because of aphasia, it may have been the first time many people had heard of the condition. For me, however, aphasia has become a core part of my constant reality, affecting me every day, all day long.

Four years ago, my brain took an unexpected detour. I suffered a stroke in my sleep. It happened suddenly without any warning. I had no symptoms or risk factors.

Afterward, the physical signs that I had a stroke were obvious. The fact that I couldn’t use my right hand at all was impossible to ignore. In the immediate aftermath, trying to regain my physical strength and abilities took all of my mental focus. I considered myself lucky — and I was. I didn’t lose my ability to walk, and I could still speak.

Physical therapy helped me regain some of the strength and control of my right hand. Eventually, I could hold a pencil steady enough to write semi-legible words, and soon after, I started typing again. At first, I was so relieved I could use the keyboard that it didn’t even matter what assortment of letters and symbols appeared on the screen.

Soon, though, I had to get back to work and try to resume my normal routine. I had lots of things to write. Deadlines loomed. Assignments needed to be finished.

That’s when I began to realize some of my words seemed to have gone missing.

I learned I have aphasia, which sounds like a cool new lipstick shade or perhaps a trendy nightclub. Instead, it’s what happens when I struggle to think of words that seem forever stuck on the tip of my tongue, just barely out of reach.

While aphasia is referred to by various medical sources as a “condition” or “disorder,” it’s also commonly listed as a symptom of another condition because it often occurs as a result of a stroke, brain tumor or other issue related to the brain.

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